Tagged: toronto

Sportsnet’s Jamie Campbell on Jays Starting Pitching & The Home Plate Collision Rule

Toronto Blue Jays 2014 Spring Training (pic via The Canadian Press/Frank Gunn)

Toronto Blue Jays 2014 Spring Training (pic via The Canadian Press/Frank Gunn)

Click here to listen to my interview with Sportsnet’s Jamie Campbell as we discuss the 2014 Blue Jays pitching options for a fifth starter, as well as MLB rule changes.

At roughly this point in time one year ago, Toronto baseball fans were excited.

Really exited.

Way too excited.

Following a series of moves and acquisitions, Alex Anthopoulos had put together a group of players that immediately moved everyone’s perception of the Blue Jays from a struggling franchise to not just a playoff contender, but a favourite to win the World Series. ESPN’s Dan Shulman wasn’t fooled. I discussed the Blue Jays collapse with Dan last year, you can find that interview here.

Oh how excited we all were.

Ticket sales were up. Merchandise sales were drastically up. New, royal-blue caps became very noticible throughout Toronto streets, bars, and of course Rogers Centre. Spring training was a media frenzy, with much focus being on the two biggest names Anthopoulos had acquired, being Reyes and Dickey. Suddenly, it was cool to be a Blue Jays fan again.

And then the Toronto Blue Jays won the 2013 World Series, we all held hands and sang Kumbaya, THE END.

…sorry, where was I? I must have been daydreaming again…

Obviously we all know how 2013 really ended for the Jays, and I find it painful and pointless drudging up the past. However, we can all learn something from history. The past gives us something to measure progress against. And progress is what the Jays could use, having come off a 74-win season (sorry, sometimes I rub salt in my own wounds).

Fast-forward to Spring training 2014. This off-season has been drastically different for Toronto. The addition of Dioner Navarro as AA’s only significant off-season acquirement pales in comparison to what he did last year. And as a result, the Blue Jays are now flying somewhat under the radar.

Florida is quieter this year, as far as the Jays are concerned. I spoke with Sportsnet’s Jamie Campbell, who said that there are significantly less reporters covering the Blue Jays this spring training. He also said it’s a welcome change for the players, considering the circus they dealt with last year. To listen to the entire interview with Jamie, click here.

Does less media mean fewer expectations?

Hardly. This is almost the same team fans were ecstatic  about last year. Only healthy…so far. Think about this scenario: Brett Lawrie, Jose Reyes, Melky Cabrera, and R.A. Dickey stay healthy for the majority of the season. Let that sink in. Now feel the warmth of the Florida sun across your face as your smile grows bigger. Let us consider one more scenario: Brandon Morrow and J.A. Happ also stay healthy. Suddenly the rotation doesn’t look so bad, does it? I know, there were so many big-name starters available this off-season, of which Toronto acquired none. But perhaps they didn’t need to. At the 2014 State of the Franchise, Anthopoulos suggested it might be a possibility to add another starter late spring. That possibility seems to be slipping away. Jamie Campbell doesn’t see it as a concern. He and I discussed the expectations from Toronto fans regarding acquiring Ervin Santana, but he pointed out that Ervin has been battling injuries. Combine that with Ervin’s expectation of a $50 Million commitment, and suddenly Toronto’s current options seem somewhat more attractive. Waiting in the wings are a handful of hungry pitchers, with a significantly smaller price tag. Toronto also had a very dominant bullpen last season. Delabar and Cecil both had All-Star worthy performances through the first-half. And who doesn’t like a fairy-tale/David-vs-Goliath style story that could be Marcus Stroman?

Yes, I know I just painted a very colourful picture with a rather optimistic brush. What can I say? I bleed blue.

But “worst-to-first” isn’t an impossibility. Ask Boston, they know all too well (jeez that still stings, doesn’t it Toronto?)

So get excited again.

Why?

Why not? It’s baseball season.

Anything can, and usually does happen.

For more on Toronto’s current pitching situation, listen to my interview here with Sportsnet’s Jamie Campbell. We also discuss the home plate collision rule change by Major League Baseball, which should prove to make for some interesting calls this season!

Follow Jamie Campbell on Twitter: @SNETCampbell

Jays Winter Training Day Thrills Fans

Jays Winter Training Day 2014

Jays Winter Training Day 2014

Torontonians in the winter months must brave everything from frigid temperatures to ice storms and loss of hydro. For many, summer sports such as baseball couldn’t be further from their minds (even though Spring Training is less than a mere 50 days away). But for a select few Blue Jays fans (45 to be exact), on January 9th, 2014 they donned their baseball gear and took to the field at Rogers Centre, having the rare opportunity to interact with baseball greats such as Pat Tabler, Jesse Barfield, Lloyd Moseby, and the most decorated Blue Jays player, Roberto Alomar. The special occasion? Another successful fundraising effort by the Jays Care Foundation, WINTER TRAINING DAY.

The official charitable arm of the Blue Jays was the 2012 recipient of the MLB Commissioner’s Award for Philanthropic Excellence, as well as the 2013 recipient of the Beyond Sport Sports Team of the Year Award. The mission of the organization is to focus energy and resources toward community-based endeavours that develop baseball programs and help children in need to excel academically, get active, and lead healthy lives. To date, Jays Care has invested over $8.2 million in Canadian children and communities.  This Winter Training Day raised over $38,000!

Greeted by a young and cheerful staff, myself and my cameraman made our way down onto the field. The participants were being taken through warm-up drills. Safety first, of course. We spoke for several minutes with Pat Tabler, who would spend a good portion of the day at the soft-toss station, giving hitting tips. In speaking with Tabby about his success in pressure situations (hitting nearly .500 with the bases loaded over his career), he attributed it to “being mentally tough”.

We then connected with the Executive Director of the Jays Care Foundation, Danielle Bedasse for a short interview:

While sitting in the dugout, I had the opportunity to speak with several participants, one admittedly in awe at moments, especially of Alomar. For baseball fans – and Blue Jays fans, it’s hard not to be.  One fan approached Alomar, shook his hand, and said “I was at the game where you hit back-to-back homeruns from opposite sides of the plate”. Alomar’s eyes lit up, and responded, “right, against Chicago”. Even Hall-of-Famers have their favourite moments. This was obviously one of them.

Alomar looked on while men and women took batting practice throws from Tabler and Moseby. After one participant fouled off a few pitches, Moseby could be heard from the mound saying, “I’ll stay here all day until you hit one hard, baby”. Everyone’s “baby” to Lloyd. Super-friendly with a large grin, Moseby threw pitch after pitch for what must have been half-an-hour. Before interviewing Moseby, we were warned that he had come straight from the airport, and had no sleep. “Could have fooled me”, I thought. His energy is infectious. We reminisced about Lloyd’s infamous base-running blunder, back in 1987 when he stole second base, then in a moment of confusion ran back to first (as the ball had sailed into centre field). The errant throw from the centre fielder by-passed the first baseman, thus allowing Moseby to steal second again! “I’m suing major league baseball for airing that footage” Moseby joked.

Attention to detail and terrific organization was apparent within the entire Winter Training Day event. Announcements over the PA system signaled the rotation of groups between stations (batting practice, soft-toss, hitting instruction, and shagging flies). I can only imagine (as participants experienced) what a thrill it would be to hear your name called over the sound system in Rogers Centre.

Walking beyond the left field wall that Joe Carter’s famous homerun sailed over, we headed down a ramp and into the Jays batting cages where participants would be taking hitting instruction from Jesse Barfield. Always good for a story, Jesse re-enacted a moment in a game where an opposing team’s fan relentlessly heckled him from the stands in right field. Barfield’s response to the fan? A monstrous homerun. The fan never spoke another word.

Upon quietly observing the event from the dugout, I noticed how much fun everyone was having – staff included. The Jays Care Foundation appears to be in great hands. The dedicated team had put together an event that everyone in attendance was bound to remember, for years to come. After all, at the end of a baseball game all you are left with are memories and experiences. It’s even better when they are special ones.

Boston Strong – Thank You From A Toronto Fan

2013 World Series Champs

2013 World Series Champs – Boston Red Sox

It took some serious consideration before I clicked publish, re-reading and re-naming the title of this post several times. Boston was the one team I didn’t want to see win. After all, John Farrell who had left the Jays for his “dream job” was now hoisting the World Series trophy above his head. Yes, Toronto had a miserably disappointing season. But as a baseball fan, this was one of the more exciting World Series I can remember in years.  A good friend of mine said he wished the series would go 14 games. I wondered, would Papi’s injuries have gotten the better of him by then, or would he have been hitting 26-for-32?

The Red Sox showed us several things this year. They showed us how powerful a team can be when they function together. They showed us what the proper leadership can foster (I’m talking about Big Papi, not Farrell…ok, maybe Farrell as well). They showed us how an entire city can rally together to overcome adversity (Boston Strong). And they showed us that they can grow some kick-ass beards. Seriously, how can you not be impressed by this?

Badass Boston Beards

Badass Boston Beards

How about us Toronto fans take away a few positives from this Boston Championship win? Who in Toronto didn’t want to see John MacDonald and Brian Butterfield get a World Series ring? I know, they’re wearing the wrong uniforms…I digress.

At the end of a LONG 162-game season, a select and fortunate group of players get to play baseball in October. Likely already nursing injuries, some of the ones who can grit their teeth and bare the pain for one more month can be elevated to baseball hero status (even if only for one game). Few become legend. Papi took it to a whole new level. Call him an icon. Call him a beast. He was in a zone even he had never experienced (though he joked that he did it all season long). Papi was the definition of do what I say, and lead by example (it’s rare that both of those happen together). He was a leader through words, and actions. Think it was coincidental that moments after Papi’s game-4 pep-talk in the dugout, that Johnny Gomes hit a home-run which would prove to be the game-winner (and likely the turning point in the series)? Perhaps, but I think if you ask any of the Boston players what impact Papi had on the team morale, energy, and composure, I’m sure you would receive a unanimous answer.

Putting things in perspective, Boston had the season Toronto expected/dreamed of having. The storybook, worst-to-first, against all odds, in the face of adversity kind of season. And as much as you can envy or hate them for it, I have to give credit where credit is due. Thank you Boston for giving us baseball fans a World Series to remember. Never have we experienced one like it (possibly the only thing it was missing was a hidden-ball trick, although the Cards had already been burned by it earlier in the season). Thank you for being gracious winners (and not peeing in the opposing teams pool). And thank you for showing Toronto that worst-to-first is possible. After all, spring training is only 115 days away…

MLB World Series Champion Matt Stairs

Toronto Blue Jays Matt Stairs

Matt Stairs has worn many different hats. Pic via CanadianBaseballNetwork.com

Click here to listen to: Brock Picken talk with Matt Stairs on Baseball, Hockey, and his Coaching Career.

Matt Stairs joins Brock Picken on The Dugout to discuss his baseball career, love of hockey, and community involvement in Fredericton.

Stairs played for 12 franchises (13 teams – Expos & Nationals being the same franchise) which is a MLB record for a position player. Stairs also holds the record for the most MLB pinch-hit HR’s with 23. Stairs is in good company with Larry Walker, Justin Morneau and Jason Bay being the only Canadian professional ball players with 200+ HR’s (Stairs with 265).

Connect with Matt Stairs on Twitter.

 

The Dugout – Show #7 – Sportsnet Broadcaster Jamie Campbell

Jamie Campbell Toronto Blue Jays

Jamie Campbell & Gregg Zaun Sportsnet Pre-Game Show.

Click here to listen to: The Dugout Show #7 – Sportsnet Broadcaster Jamie Campbell talks Blue Jays Baseball

Brock Picken talks with Sportsnet Broadcaster Jamie Campbell from Dunedin Florida, where he is covering the Toronto Blue Jays spring training. They discuss R.A. Dickey and who will be catching him, as well as Emilio Bonifacio’s throwing issues, and Jose Bautista‘s early display of home runs and if the wrist is at all a concern. They also discuss the possible return of Dustin McGowan to pitch out of the bullpen, whether or not to expect to see Adam Loewen get any playing time, and what could become of Adam Lind if he doesn’t have as good a season as he is having this spring. Finally, they discuss the manner in which John Farrell left for Boston, and what Farrell should expect upon his return to Toronto for the Blue Jays vs Red Sox series starting April 5, 2013.

The Dugout – Show #5 – Al Coombs 1290 CJBK London Radio: Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame

Al Coombs talks Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame

Al Coombs & Brock Picken talk Blue Jays Baseball.

Click Here to Listen To: The Dugout Show #5 – Al Coombs on The Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame

Brock Picken & Al Coombs from 1290 CJBK London Talk Radio talk Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, American League East expectations for 2013, no-hitters that weren’t, and wild Toronto Blue Jays predictions.

Listen to Al’s London Radio Show: Click Here

Subscribe to The Dugout on iTunes: http://bit.ly/DUGOUTiTunes

The Dugout – Show #4 – Brock & Scott Mullen Talk Pitching: Jack Morris, Paul Quantrill & Sergio Santos

Jack Morris in his 'new" uniform.

Jack Morris joins Sportsnet as a broadcaster.

Click Here to Listen to: The Dugout Show #4 – Jays Pitching Greats & Closer Duel

Host of the Dugout Brock Picken, & Guest Scott Mullen talk Toronto Blue Jays baseball. Jack Morris joins Sportsnet as a broadcaster. Paul Quantrill named as a Jays consultant. Pat Hentgen returns as the Bullpen manager. And the Jays have yet to determine who their official closer will be: Casey Janssen or Sergio Santos?